COVID, News

NSW records 466 new Covid cases, as heightened police presence, and tough rules announced

Picture Tim Mossholder on Pexels.com

INCREASED fines of up to $5,000 for COVID breaches, $320 COVID-19 Test and Isolate Support Payments, permits to enter regional NSW and a heightened police presence will be introduced, as NSW continues to battle the Delta variant. 

NSW recorded 466 new locally acquired cases of COVID-19 in the 24 hours to 8pm last night, with four COVID-related deaths. There were 130,000 tests completed in the reporting period. Two new cases were detected in the Illawarra Shoalhaven area.

As a consequence, Greater Sydney and other lockdown areas, including Wollongong, the NSW Government has announced it will reduce the 10km rule from 12.01am Monday, August 16, with shopping, exercise and outdoor recreation to be done in a person’s local government area (LGA) or, if outside their LGA, within 5km of home.

LGAs of concern must still exercise and shop within 5km from home only.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the vast majority of people are doing the right thing but there are a handful of people who are wilfully breaking the rules and putting the rest of the community at risk.

“The increased fines and heightened police presence are about ensuring people who are doing the wrong thing are caught and punished appropriately,” Ms Berejiklian said.

Under the changes, there will be increased fines for Public Health Order breaches, a permit system to enter regional NSW and tightened rules for people in LGAs of concern to help reduce the spread of the Delta variant.

Increased fines for Public Health Order breaches (from 12.01am, Monday, August 16): 

  • $5,000 on the spot fine for breaching self-isolation rules;
  • $5,000 on the spot fine for lying on a permit (already a criminal offence);
  • $5,000 on the spot fine for lying to a contact tracer (already a criminal offence);
  • $3,000 on the spot fine for breaching the two person outdoor exercise/recreation rule; and
  • $3,000 on the spot fine for breaching rules around entry into regional NSW for authorised work, inspecting real estate and travelling to your second home.

Permit system to enter regional NSW (from 12.01am, Saturday, August 21):

  • inspecting real estate. Any person inspecting real estate in the regions must now genuinely need a home to live in (no investment properties); and
  • travelling to your second home. This is now only allowed if you are using the home for work accommodation or if the home requires urgent maintenance and repairs (if so, only one person may travel there).

Changes for residents in local government areas of concern:

  • From 12.01am, Monday, 16 August: only exercise and supervision of children allowed (no outdoor recreation); 
  • From 12.01am, Saturday, 21 August: People who live alone must now register their “singles bubble”. Registration will be made available on nsw.gov.au.
  • Minister for Police and Emergency Services David Elliott said the NSW Police Force will also have an increased and more visible presence across Greater Sydney, backed up by 500 additional Australian Defence Force personnel. 

“We’ve had to tighten the current public health orders because of the minority who exploited them. In the LGAs of concern it will no longer be acceptable to leave your home for outdoor recreation, meaning gathering at parks or outside takeaway shops or cafes is not on. Enough is enough. If you do it, you will get fined,” Mr Elliott said.

“Residents across Greater Sydney and lockdown areas can also expect to see enhanced random police checkpoints on roads, to ensure people are complying with the stay at home rules aimed to protect the community.”

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said the joint NSW Police Force and ADF operation – Operation STAY AT HOME – would commence on Monday, 16 August.

“These are some of the strongest powers we’ve ever had in the history of the NSW Police Force, as part of the government’s strategy to get in front of the virus in the coming weeks – it’s all about getting ahead of Delta, not chasing it,” Commissioner Fuller said.

“From this week we’ll be issuing $5,000 fines to people and closing premises which continue to break the health orders. Don’t complain if this happens to you – police are over the rule breakers.”

In addition, eligible workers aged 17 and over who live in the LGAs of concern, who have symptoms of COVID-19, get tested and isolate until a negative result is returned, will be eligible for one $320 payment in a four week period for lost wages.

The ‘COVID-19 Test and Isolate Support Payments’ start next week and will help cover lost wages of casual workers but also those who may have exhausted their sick leave or carer’s leave to isolate at home.

Those waiting on their test results will get the $320 payment in their bank account within three business days of applying online at Service NSW. 

There will also be a new $400 hardship payment payable through the Red Cross, for temporary visa holders and others in the community who are ineligible for Government financial support.

COVID-19 information and eligibility and how to apply will be made available soon.


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About Mick Roberts

A journalist, writer and historian, Mick Roberts specialises in Australian cultural history, particularly associated with the Australian hotel and liquor industry. Mick has had an interest in revealing the colourful story of pubs, inns and associated industries in Australia for over 30 years. He is currently working on a comprehensive history of the hotel and liquor industry in the Illawarra region of NSW. Besides writing a number of history books, Mick has owned and managed several community newspapers. He was one time editor of the Wollongong Northern News, The Bulli Times, The Northern Times, The Northern Leader and The Local - all located in the Wollongong region. As a journalist he has worked for Rural Press, Cumberland (News Limited), Sydney based, City News, and Torch Publications based in Canterbury Bankstown, NSW. He currently calls the inner-Sydney suburb of Surry Hills home.

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